MSE250 F11 Repository

Welcome to the MSE250 Repository - a source of various informational and downloadable goodies that can help you in understanding course material and materials science in general. Enjoy your visit!

Important Dates/Notices

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Downloadable Docs [updated 16 Dec.]

9 Sept., 2011Grade tracking sheet
3 Oct., 2011Homework 3 comments
6 Oct., 2011Worksheet on plastic deformation and strengthening
8 Oct., 2011MSE250 Overview for Exam 1
11 Oct., 2011Homework 4 comments
13 Oct., 2011Worksheet on heat treatment/annealing
20 Oct., 2011Worksheet on failure mechanisms
20 Oct., 2011How to read a log scale
24 Oct., 2011Homework 5 comments
24 Oct., 2011Phase diagrams for Homework 6 (found in your book but posted here for convenience)
26 Oct., 2011MSE250 Overview for Quiz 2
01 Nov., 2011Homework 7 graphs and textbook questions (8th ed.)
03 Nov., 2011Worksheet on phase transformations [master] [blanks]
05 Nov., 2011MSE250 Overview for Exam 2 - first draft
07 Nov., 2011Homework 8 figures, tables, and questions from textbook
09 Nov., 2011MSE250 Overview for Exam 2 - final draft; Wynarsky-approved, 4:40pm, Nov. 9, 2011
09 Nov., 2011Pre-exam 2 discussion review [master] [blanks]
14 Nov., 2011Homework 9 questions from textbook (8th ed.)
17 Nov., 2011Worksheet on polymer structures/properties [master] [blanks]
21 Nov., 2011Homework 10 questions and tables from textbook (8th ed.)
23 Oct., 2011Homework 9 comments
26 Nov., 2011Worksheet on polymer structures/properties, part 2 [master] [blanks]
6 Dec., 2011Term grades as of 6 December, 2011
7 Dec., 2011Worksheet on corrosion and degradation of materials [master] [blank]
9 Dec., 2011Worksheet on electrical properties [master, pg. 4 corrected] [blank]
12 Dec., 2011Complete lecture notes
16 Dec., 2011MSE250 overview for final exam (topic-specific section, 100 pts.)
16 Dec., 2011Worksheet on materials selection for final exam (comprehensive section, 20 pts.)

Lecture Recordings

**A suggestion when listening to recordings: download the file, and load it in Windows Media Player. Go to "Now Playing" mode --> right-click anywhere --> Enhancements --> play speed settings. You can now listen to the lecture at a faster rate (save your time)!
DateLecture Content
2011 Oct 19 (Wed)Failure 2
07:20 - Fatigue cont'd
10:57 - Fracture surface images (fractography)
19:35 - Ways to Increase Fatigue Strength
29:20 - Motivation for studying creep
31:25 - Creep
40:40 - Creep Mechanisms
2011 Oct 21 (Fri)Phase diagrams 1
00:20 - Polyphase materials
12:10 - Cu-Ni phase diagram
18:50 - solubility limit and relationship to phase composition
24:10 - solubility in solids (e.g. Cu-Ag)
37:30 - inverse lever rule
2011 Oct 24 (Mon)Phase diagrams 2
00:10 - recap/two-phase example for hypothetical alloy A-B (handout)
07:45 - phase compositions/amounts of a two-phase region at different T
09:24 - atomic vs. weight percent (Li-Pb)
12:03 - phase regions (Cu-Zn); corrosion resistance; dashed lines at low T; one-two-one rule for phase regions at any isotherm
18:30 - line compound (Mg-Pb)
20:53 - microstructure of slowly cooled binary alloys
40:55 - invariant points (Cu-Al, handout)
49:40 - how did the "invariant point" get its name?
2011 Oct 26 (Wed)Phase diagrams 3 / Intro. phase transformation kinetics
00:00 - plain carbon steel phase diagram (Fig 9.24); interstitial sites of carbon in ferrite and austenite
15:11 - importance of austenite
16:51 - invariant points in steel, cast iron vs. molded steel
20:17 - terminology around pearlite eutectoid point:
pearlite (Fig 9.28)
hypoeutectoid composition(Fig 9.29)
hypereutectoid composition(Fig 9.32)
24:48 - microstucture around pearlite eutectoid point
31:30 - calculating microstructure amounts using inverse lever rule
37:55 - intro. to rate effects/phase transformation kinetics
46:50 - transformation kinetics handout
51:20 - time-temperature transformation diagram (Fig 10.13)
2011 Oct 28 (Fri)Phase transformation kinetics 2 (steel)
00:00 - steel time-temperature transformation diagram (Fig. 10.18)
00:55 - undercooling below the austenite eutectoid temperature / what is the T-t graph good for?
01:45 - pearlite: rapidly cool to 600°C, hold isothermally for 103 s
04:24 - pearlite microstructure (Fig. 10.15)
10:08 - bainite: rapidly cool to 450°C, hold for 100 s (bainite microstructure: Fig. 10.17)
13:33 - martensite: diffusion-less quenching (Fig. 10.22 - *assume, for this class, that cooling is fast enough that ALL austenite transforms into martensite)
15:30 - metastability, crystal structure, and microstructure of martensite (Fig. 10.21)
21:14 - examples of incomplete transformations (Fig. 10.22; mix of pearlite/bainite + martensite)
27:43 - practical uses of isothermal heat treatment
30:00 - heat treatment at 2 different temperatures (Fig. 10.24)
33:53 - reasons for martensite's huge loss of ductility; reheating to obtain tempered martensite microstructure (not on T-t diagram!)
41:55 - spheroidite (not on T-t diagram!)
45:08 - microstructure of spheroidite vs. tempered martensite (Fig. 10.19/33)
2011 Oct 31 (Mon)Phase transformation kinetics 3 (steel) / Precipitation hardening 1
00:00 - review: isothermal cooling T-t transformation diagram and microstructures for 0.76 wt.% (eutectoid) alloy (Fig. 10-22)
02:12 - isothermal T-t transformation diagram for 0.45 wt.% (hypoeutectoid) alloy (Fig. 10-39)
08:59 - isothermal T-t transformation diagram for 1.13 wt.% (hypereutectoid) alloy (Fig. 10-16)
16:05 - isothermal T-t transformation diagram for a 4340 alloy (Fig. 10-23)
17:45 - isothermal vs. continuous cooling curve for 0.76 wt.% (eutectoid) alloy (Fig. 10-26,27; class handout combines these figures)
26:38 - continuous cooling curve for 0.35 wt.% (hypoeutectoid) alloy (class handout)
30:10 - continuous cooling curve for 4340 alloy (Fig. 10-28)
32:58 - microstructure-property relationships (Fig. 10-30)
- microstructures: spheroidite, coarse pearlite, fine pearlite
- properties: hardness, ductility
40:40 - comparing pearlite and martensite microstructure-property relationships (Fig. 10-32)
- microstructures: fine pearlite, martensite, tempered martensite
- properties: hardness (ductility discussed)
42:18 - precipitation (age) hardening in (non-ferrous) metals (Ch. 11.9)
43:28 - phase diagram requirements for an alloy to be precipitation (age) hardened
45:05 - procedure for precipitation hardening
2011 Nov 02 (Wed)Precipitation hardening 2 / Ceramics 1
00:00 - review of precipitation hardening
06:30 - precipitation hardening of Cu-Al (Fig. 11.24-25)
13:15 - "practical range" of precipitation hardening
17:15 - precipitation hardening synthesis-property relationships for a 2014 Al alloy (Fig. 11.27)
25:20 - introduction to ceramics
33:28 - bonding in ceramics
35:45 - general characteristics of ceramics
39:45 - properties of ionic crystalline ceramics
2011 Nov 04 (Fri)Ceramics 2
00:00 - ionic ceramic crystal structures
00:00 - AX crystal structures (zincblende, NaCl structure, CsCl structure)
04:40 - AmXp structures (CaF2, Al2O3)
08:54 - AmBnXp (Ba2TiO4)
12:04 - covalent ceramic crystal structures (e.g. GaAs)
16:00 - silicate(SiO4)-based ceramics
20:10 - clays (aluminosilicates)
20:33 - difference between silica, silicon, and silicone
21:15 - glasses
24:00 - carbon-based ceramics (diamond cubic structure, graphite, buckyball)
26:06 - defects in ceramics
28:45 - properties of ceramics: why are ceramics brittle? (*very important*)
2011 Nov 07 (Mon)Ceramics 3
00:00 - mechanical properties of ceramics
(fracture vs. yield strength, tensile vs. compressive loading; 4-point bending)
08:14 - factors affecting strength of ceramics
15:55 - relationships between stiffness/strength and porosity/size of specimen
18:45 - plane strain fracture toughness of ceramics
20;32 - ZrO2 (zirconia) Y2O3 (yttria) alloy; stress-induced phase transformation
24:18 - thermal properties of ceramics
- e.g. why fused silica fibers are use for space shuttle tiles
38:00 - hardness and wear resistance of ceramics
- why metals have a higher coefficient of friction than covalent or ionic ceramics
- adsorption (ionic ceramics) vs. absorption (sponge)
43:00 - electrical properties of ceramics
44:50 - comparing volume vs. T of crystalline and non-crystalline (amorphous) materials - viscosity discussion
2011 Nov 09 (Wed)Ceramics 4 / Bioceramics
2011 Nov 10 (Thu)Pre-Exam 2 Review
Audience questions
• How are point defects different in ceramics vs. in metals?
• Why does failure occur first at flaws in ceramics?
Precipitation hardening: what is the difference between the theta, theta-prime, theta-double prime phases (e.g. Cu-Be)?
• Precipitation hardening: can you precipitation-harden iron-carbide alloy?
• Difference between precipitation hardening and tempering
• In precipitation hardening: what is age hardening?
• If we start from martensite, what is the difference between getting tempered martensite and spheroidite?
Glass transition temperature vs. melting temperature, volume change
• Is there ever a direct transition from liquid to solid for amorphous materials?
• What does it mean if you're given the melting temperature for an amorphous material?
• What is shot peening?
• What to know for creep mechanisms?
TTT: "resetting the clock"
• Does the stress magnification at a crack apply for ductile or brittle materials, or both?
• What is the difference in microstructure between eutectic and eutectoid?
• Microstructure talk...
• In continuous cooling, will we be given the rate of cooling (e.g. 140 C/s)?
• What is the microstructure when you go through a peritectic/peritectoid point?
• Why is there no stress perpendicular to the surfaces (plane strain/stress)?
• What is nucleation?
• On the ductile-to-brittle transition graph, what does the y-axis (impact energy) mean?
• BCC, HCP, FCC ductile-to-brittle transition behavior
• Is electronegativity the primary way to determine ionic or covalent bonding?
• What are the concepts behind the different stages of creep?
2011 Nov 14 (Mon)Polymers 1
00:00 - introduction to polymers
03:15 - bond angle of carbon backbone
05:00 - 24:00 - examples of common polymers (Table 14.3)
09:50 - structure-property relationship: chain mobility vs. Tg
24:42 - molecular structures of polymers
34:59 - elastomers
46:53 - vulcanization to obtain elasticity of rubber
2011 Nov 16 (Wed)Polymers 2
00:00 - review of thermoplast, thermoset, elastomer characteristics
02:22 - molecular weight
05:00 - effect of molecular weight on properties
12:12 - tacticity
15:26 - copolymers
19:50 - copolymer example: thermoplastic elastomer (block styrene-butadiene, Fig. 15.22)
22:19 - crystallinity in polymers (thermoplasts only)
26:28 - effect of crystallinity on properties I
28:02 - factors that affect crystallinity (handout)
37:25 - example: branched atactic PS vs. linear isotactic PP
42:16 - effect of crystallinity on properties II
46:18 - stress-strain diagram for a simple thermoplast

2011 Nov 18 (Fri)
00:00 - stress-strain diagram of a "simple" thermoplast (ex: plastic bag)
05:18 - plastic deformation of a thermoplast
06:43 - effect of temperature on thermoplast properties (ex: PMMA, Fig. 15.3)
8:53 - stress-strain diagram of an elastomer; dependence on cross-linking
11:36 - stress-strain of a thermoset
12:36 - elastomer example, part 1: racketball above Tg
13:28 - strengths of metals vs. polymers
14:32 - factors affecting Tg and Tm
19:40 - Tg and Tm of common thermoplasts
22:08 - ice cube tray vs. coffee cup
25:54 - Tg (useful temperature range) of common elastomers (Table 15.4)
26:57 - elastomer example, part 2: racketball below Tg
29:42 - viscoelasticity
33:36 - viscoelastic example: picnic knife
36:26 - stress relaxation
36:26 - constant-strain loading; relaxation modulus, ER(t)
41:14 - constant-stress loading; creep modulus, EC(t)
42:22 - viscoelasticity example: silly putty
47:56 - effect of strain rate on stress-strain characteristics
50:00 - effect of temperature on stiffness (ER(t))
2011 Nov 21 (Mon)Polymers 4 / Composites 1
00:00 - review of modulus vs. temperature for thermoplasts and elastomers
02:00 - fatigue of polymers
03:05 - crazing
06:30 - composites: motivation (ex: pole vault)
11:08 - definitions
14:56 - other examples of composites from sports
16:34 - overview of composite types
particle-reinforced composites
18:50 - large-particle composites
19:10 - rule of mixtures
24:07 - concrete
39:39 - cermets (ex: bandsaw blades)
41:56 - elastomer or plastic composites
43:45 - dispersion strengthened composites
2011 Nov 23 (Wed)Composites 2
fiber-reinforced composites
02:50 - specific strength, specific stiffness/modulus, and specific gravity
08:06 - definition of density of composites, ρc
10:43 - specific strength vs. specific modulus for metals and fiber composites
18:05 - importance of using fibers with thin dimensions
30:47 - fiber characteristics
34:39 - role of the matrix
36:36 - stresses in a fiber reinforced composite and the critical length
2011 Nov 25 (Fri)Composites 3
00:00 - review of critical fiber length
00:49 - fiber-matrix interfacial bonding
05:46 - strength of fiber-reinforced composites
22:13 - stiffness of fiber-reinforced composites
27:05 - 3 common fibers (glass, carbon/graphite, aramid/Kevlar)
42:33 - laminate composites
45:15 - sandwich panels
2011 Nov 30 (Wed)Corrosion 1
2011 Dec 02 (Fri)Corrosion 2
If anyone happens to listen to this, could you kindly email me the timing annotations, like I've done for all previous lectures? I'm sure everyone would appreciate it...
2011 Dec 05 (Mon)Electrical Properties 1
If anyone happens to listen to this, could you kindly email me the timing annotations, like I've done for all previous lectures? I'm sure everyone would appreciate it...
2011 Dec 07 (Wed)Electrical Properties 2
If anyone happens to listen to this, could you kindly email me the timing annotations, like I've done for all previous lectures? I'm sure everyone would appreciate it...
2011 Dec 09 (Fri)Biomaterials 1
If anyone happens to listen to this, could you kindly email me the timing annotations, like I've done for all previous lectures? I'm sure everyone would appreciate it...
2011 Dec 12 (Mon)Biomaterials 2 - Last day of class
2011 Dec 18 (Sun)Final exam review

Links

Contact

Aaron
Email: tanaaron@umich.edu
Chat: aaron.c.tan.music@gmail.com
Office: 2076 Dow
Office hours: 2:30-4:30pm Thursdays, CSE 1637; 4:30-6:30pm Thursdays, 2076 Dow

Dr. Wynarsky
Email: wynarsky@engin.umich.edu
Office: 2042 Dow
Office hours: after 4pm, Tuesdays and Thursdays, in front of 1504 GGB